Amarillo, TX
Praeclarus Press
Webinar: Preventing Low Milk Production: Strategies for Professionals to Help Mothers Protect Their Milk Supplies
Tue, December 05, 2017 1:00PM to 2:30PM (Eastern)
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Preventing Low Milk Production: Strategies for Professionals to Help Mothers Protect Their Milk Supplies














 




Important: The live webinar will be recorded and sent to everyone who buys a ticket. We have applied for CERPs.

Summary

 
Mothers’ perceptions of low milk supply is the most frequent cause of early weaning worldwide. Mothers may believe that they have low milk production and supplement, which leads to actual low milk production if mothers do not receive skilled professional interventions. Since, biologically, the majority of healthy mothers can produce enough milk for their babies, strategies should be focused on protecting this capacity rather than treating low milk supply once it occurs.
 

OBJECTIVES:

 

I. Prenatal strategies to prevent low milk supply

 
Objective 1: Participants will learn which prenatal parent education strategy may be effective in preventing low milk supply.
 
Objective 2: Participants will learn about antenatal expression of colostrum and its possible role in preventing low milk supply.

Objective 3: Participants will learn about the importance of breastfeeding support groups (“the tribe”) in the prevention of low milk supply.
 

II. Immediate postpartum strategies to prevent low milk supply

 
Objective 1: Participants will understand the importance of immediate skin-to-skin contact for the prevention of low milk supply
 
Objective 2:  Participants will understand the importance of early colostrum expression
 


III. Postpartum (2 to 48 hours) strategies to prevent low milk supply

 
Objective 1: Participants will know which interventions may be used effectively in this period to prevent of low milk supply
 
Objective 2:  Participants will know what tools parents must have upon discharge to prevent low milk supply
 

IV. Clinical toolbox to help prevent and manage low milk supply


Objective 1: Participants will be able to identify normal, effective suckling.
 
Objective 2:  Participants will be able to determine signs of adequate milk supply and basic intervention if there is not.
 
 

PRESENTATION OUTLINE

I. Prenatal strategies to prevent low milk supply

1. Parent education: pregnant mothers and their partners should:
            - learn about normal baby behavior
            - learn objective signs by which to know if their baby is eating enough.
2. Antenatal extraction of colostrum
            - this practice has shown to be safe
- teaching it to expectant mothers may be a useful tool in raising their self-efficacy and feeling of empowerment, which is basic for the prevention of low milk supply.
3. Importance of being around other mothers and their babies
            - Often in our modern culture the first child a mother holds is her own. Being part of a group of mothers and babies helps to create realistic expectations and raises knowledge about normal baby behaviour.
 
II. Immediate postpartum strategies to prevent low milk supply

1. Skin-to-skin contact in the immediate postpartum is associated with the increase breastfeeding duration.
           
- In skin-to-skin contact the baby´s brain begins to wire for effective feeding and positive social and emotional skills – this will help to prevent low milk supply.

2. If the baby does not latch in the immediate postpartum, or does not suckle effectively, or mother and baby are separated, early and effective extraction of colostrum should begin within this period.     
A simple algorythm will be provided.
 

III. Postpartum (2 to 48 hours) strategies to prevent low milk supply

 
1. Maintaining frequent skin-to-skin contact
           
- Mother´s brain goes through intensive re-wiring during the postpartum, but requires close contact with her child. This programming helps mother to understand her baby´s needs and cues more intuitively.

2. Observing a feed per turn during hospital stay

- Hospital staff must be certain at all times that the baby is able to feed effectively. This must be registered in the clinical history.

3. Intervene if baby is not feeding effectively
           
- The earlier the intervention (frequent, effective colostrum/milk removal), the easier it is to prevent low milk supply.
           
- The intervention is two-fold: to feed the baby with mother´s own colostrum/milk (to prevent low blood sugar/dehidraton in the neonate) and to protect mother´s milk supply.

4. Upon discharge, parents must:
            - Know how to manage breast engorgment
            - Know the signs that their baby is eating enough
            - Know where to go if they have a breastfeeding problem.


A simple algorythm will be provided.

 
IV. Clinical toolbox to help prevent and manage low milk supply

1. A person providing breasfeeding support MUST be able to determine if a baby is effectively removing milk from the breast.
            - With the help of several videos, we will work on this skill.

2.  A simple algorythm will be provided to outline basic management of low milk supply.
How to determine when there is a true low mlk supply, and other posible causes




Dr. Carmela Baeza is a medical doctor, specialized in family medicine and in sexual therapy in Madrid, Spain. She became an IBCLC in 2005, and has been a BFHI Evaluator since 2006. She works in a private Family Wellness Clinic, Raices, where she is in charge of the lactation program. She teaches Natural Family Planning (Symptothermal Method and LAM), and is the current president of the Spanish Lactation Consultant Association (AECCLM).
 
Over the past seven years she has coordinated more than 40 breastfeeding courses, in which her educational team has trained over 3,000 doctors, midwives, and nurses from both the Spanish National Health Service and the private sector in Spain.
 
Dr. Baeza is part of a workgroup on ankyloglossia; they are currently conducting a clinical study to determine the effectiveness of frenotomy vs conservative treatment on posterior tongue-tie. She is also part of a workgroup for the study of chronic breast pain and mastitis.
 
Dr. Baeza is the author of Amar con los Brazos Abiertos (To Love with Open Arms), a parenting book. It has two parts, the first to make the science behind breastfeeding easy for parents to grasp, and the second to address everyday parenting emotional issues that parents can turn from barriers into assets for their family growth.
 
She is married to Carlos and has five children. 

 
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